Tech Showcase at the Fledge

7 to 9 p.m.

The Fledge

1300 Eureka St., Lansing

Click here for event page


It’s time for Lansing to test its newfangled tech contraptions and ideas at the Fledge’s tech showcase.


“On the public side, our high tech scene is under appreciated and undervalued,” said Fledge owner Jerry Norris. “You don't need to be near saltwater to create something hi tech.”


At 7 p.m. there will be a networking session for 30 minutes including water, soft drinks and pizza, then a tour of the Fledge and presentations to close out the night.


Norris said events like this help local tech developers get community feedback on their project. “We hope to showcase Lansing’s creative economy of art, music and technology,” said Norris.


“Those are the three things we are highly focused on now. From our side, it rounds out the creative economy.”


Sponsored by TEK Systems, scheduled presentations include laser etching, a coding camp project and a crypto social research program.


It is important to put on creative and technological events with economic trends in automation, said Norris, to prepare people for the jobs of the future.


“The jobs of the future will be centered around innovation,” said Norris. “When you look at some of the more laborious jobs, these could be automated jobs, and will disappear slowly,” said Norris.


Events like this help complete the community mission at the Fledge as well, said Norris.


“Our mission is to give entrepreneurs the opportunity to create. When they are passionate and able to grow their idea, it is in their pursuit of happiness.”


Moving into Lansing in May from Grand Ledge, Norris said business is expanding. “We are getting new people in every single day,” said Norris.


“Our rate of growth is 10 times what it was in Grand Ledge, and that isn’t a made up statistic. The Eastside neighborhood was the ideal space for us to move into, and the neighborhood seemed thirsty for a place to come and use.”


Kids are welcome to present their tech ideas at the event as well, said Norris.


“Exposing kids to different interest sets is important because they are taught courses on the basics but don't get to experiment, or get exposed to other things right here in our neighborhood,” said Norris.


Community mentorship with events like this is important, said Norris.


“I was a wrestler at U.M., and in that process I had mentors and coaches that helped guide me in my value system and discipline,” said Norris. “In my career, I had these great mentors helping me and now I'm at a point to where I can help people and still get mentored too.”


If interested in presenting, contact erik.gillespie@gmail.com for more info.