Let the chorizo, lengua, asada, tamales and tortas flow with the latest installment of the food truck scene: Taquero Mucho in South Lansing.

“My whole family has always been part of the restaurant business working for other people,” said owner Victor Banda. “We were like, 'Hey, let’s branch off and start our own thing.'” Learning to cook from his mother, Banda said, He started making tortillas by hand. "That’s where I caught the want to make everything else. I flew with it,” he said.

Taquero Mucho is one of only a few authentic Mexican food trucks in Lansing, said Banda.

“You have to get here early in the morning to make everything fresh,” said Banda. “It is about sticking with your roots and not being afraid that people won't try out your food. Everyone is willing to try something new.”

Handmade tortillas make a difference, said Banda. “We use a griddle or comal. You get your masa and you press them to the size you want, put them on the comal and flip them.”

Banda believes food trucks are the way of the future.

“I’m proud to be a part of this movement. It’s great that you can move around and go to a lot of places showing people what you can provide for the city,” said Banda. “People don't enjoy just sitting in restaurants nowadays. They want something quick to grab and eat.”

However, the food truck environment presents challenges different from a restaurant.

The biggest challenge is the heat. "It can get really hot for the employees, even 100 degrees Fahrenheit in there.” Banda said.

The small amount of space and how to use it properly is a big deal as well.

Besides food, Taquero Mucho offers Hamaica, Tamarindo and horchata drinks.

“Most people use a powder to make these but we have to spend a lot of time in the morning preparing the actual fruit.”

Banda has found that South Lansing is hospitable to food trucks. “Cedar Street is really busy. There are a lot of businesses nearby, and word-of-mouth did a lot for us.”

Future plans for Taquero Mucho are branching off across Lansing with a fleet of food trucks. “Our end goal would be to get our own restaurant,” Banda said.

Happy hour is from 2 to 5 p.m. with three tacos of any meat for $5.

Banda said that people shouldn’t be afraid to try authentic Mexican food though it is somewhat different from its American counterpart.

“Youa might be caught off guard at first by the way something sounds but when you taste it, it is all a combination and everything hits your taste buds at one time.”


Taquero Mucho

2408 S. Cedar St.

Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday, Closed. (517) 303-7882