Swing and blues social dance

Free swing lesson,8 p.m. to 9 p.m.

$5 open dance, 9 p.m. to 12 a.m.

Cedar Street Art Collective

1701 S. Cedar St.


Got nothing to do on Labor day weekend? Put on those dancing shoes and come out for a judgment free swing dance.


“This is casual, relaxed fun not attached to any social expectations,” Maggie Robinson, president and event organizer of Lansing Stomp said. “Once you try it, you'll wonder why you were scared.”


Noticing a lack of swing dancing operations between Grand Rapids and Detroit, Robinson started the Lansing Stomp as a nonprofit to encourage this traditional American dance form.


“Now, we provide an alcohol free space where people can socialize, make connections, enjoy themselves and exercise.”


The height of popularity in the ‘20s through the ‘40s, swing dance was born out of Harlem with a dance called the lindy hop.


“I believe that when the bandstands fell out of favor, that's when swing took a dive,” Robinson said.

Swing dancing is a way to get to know someone without speaking, Robinson said. “In close space, you understand the idiosyncrasies of people's personalities. When you are dancing with someone you are feeling them.”


Beginners shouldn’t worry about making mistakes.


“Failing is part of it — it makes it more fun and interesting. It is a dance that lets you embrace your mistakes.”


Also, part of the night includes a blues dance from 11 p.m. to 12 a.m.


“On a dance level, blues is a little bit more low impact and simpler in its style. Swing is more aerobic.”


Robinson puts on these shows for the love of the craft, she said.


“I get to dance every weekend and I get to meet people. We are all volunteers and everything goes back into holding dances. We have a place to share what we love and meet people in our community.”