Peter Abrami's "Sorting Sightings"

11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Lansing Art Gallery & Education Center

119 N. Washington Sq. Suite 101, Lansing

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Trip yourself out with art done “pareidolia style,” which plays on the psychology of the mind to perceive a pattern where none actually exists.


“My most recent work is an accumulation of years of material and color exploration combined with my interests in psychology, childhood development and the science of vision,” Peter Abrami, an associate of the Interlochen Center for the Arts, said.


“I am interested in presenting art with an abstract set of visual clues that is left for the viewer to sort and make sense of.”


The attraction to a visual set of abstract clues came from wondering about his daughters’ baby toys and their faces.


“I started to wonder why this was the case and, through my research, came across the psychological process of pareidolia. As I researched the subject more deeply — and saw how many aspects of daily perception it informed — I was inspired to create works that actively engaged with this process.”


One form of this is his “particulates” art pieces, which look like puzzle pieces scattered about on a table.


“The particulate drawings are examples of work where I follow a process through to completion without a set composition or pre-conceived arrangement in mind. One mark follows another till a web of marks fill the page.”


This requires a steady hand and focus, because working on them can be “almost meditative.”


“Because of the physical stamina, and focus it takes to complete some of the larger works, I pace myself throughout the drawing process; working for 30 to 40 minute intervals and then braking to rest my hand.”


Large drawings can take a few weeks to complete while smaller ones only can take a day, Abrami added.


“Sorting Sightings” is a play on the sightings of paranormal and supernatural activity throughout cultures and history.


“When people report these activities, many times they are linking together unrelated events or phenomena into a pattern,” Abrami said. “It's not that I particularly believe that any of these sightings are real, I am more interested in the psychological mechanisms that allow for these experiences to occur in the first place.”


The exhibit runs until Oct. 30


Other events in Lansing:


September 2018 Brew Run


5:30 to 8:30 p.m., Lansing Brewing Company, 518 E. Shiawassee St., Lansing


Distiller's Night: Long Road Distillers


5:30 to 10 p.m., The Creole Burger Bar and Southern Kitchen, 1218 Turner St., Lansing


Jazz in the Capital City


6:30 to 9:30 p.m., Tavern and Tap, 101 S. Washington Sq., Lansing