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Today in Lansing: Old Time music Valentine’s Day show at Turner-Dodge House

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Live Music at Turner-Dodge House

7 to 10 p.m.

$10 Turner-Dodge House and Heritage Center 100 E. North St., Lansing

Click here for event page

THURSDAY, FEB. 14 — The archaic columns of the historic Turner-Dodge House will once more be graced by the sounds of old time fiddles, banjos and ballads in this intimate Valentine’s Day show.

Musicians Anna-Marie Herman of Willow Mountain and Clair Sweeney will bring an organic Appalachian style performance.

Old time music does not equal folk music, Herman said.

“It is traditional Appalachian. Immigrants came over from Ireland and Scotland settling in the mountains. These were isolated regions and songs were boiled down and passed down by ear for generations.”

Herman first got into old time from going to Contra dances and events put on by Elderly Instruments and Ten Pound Fiddle.

Between her mother playing old time CDs and her brother playing banjo, it was only a matter of time before she took up Appalachian style music, she said.

“I started playing fiddle at the time as a child. Then, I took a break and continued dancing in the old time community,” Herman said.

Performing in the Turner-Dodge House is special, she said. She last performed there a few years ago with fellow fiddle player Chris Scales.

“It is a really cozy environment and very acoustic. You can get a very pure sound,” Herman said. “Since old time is meant to be played in parties and small acoustic events, you’ll get to experience it in its core goodness.”

The music reflects the period of when the house was built, she added. “They were having dances and the Virginia Reel was a favorite of the Turner-Dodge.”

According to Encyclopedia Britannica, the Virginia Reel was a country dance brought over by English colonists named “Sir Roger de Coverley.” Originating in Ireland in the 1700s, the dance gained popularity in the United States from 1830 to 1890.

Valentine’s Day will be considered, but not the sole purpose of the show, she said.

“It is kind of hard because with old time, a lot of songs are about when things went bad and end in murder. I deleted a couple murder scenes and made it a little more lovey. It will also be a fairly instrumental evening.”

Though Herman only plays several shows a year, she is still very active in supporting and engaging in the local music scene.

“Music feeds my soul. I wouldn't be me without music. It can be a deep connection to people I don't even know and I can feel that connection.”

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/WillowMountainMusic

More events in Lansing:

Love Stinks: Emo Karaoke

9 p.m. to 2 a.m., The Avenue Cafe, 2021 E. Michigan Ave., Lansing

Valentine’s Day at Cask and Co.

5 to 10 p.m., Cask & Company, 3415 E. Saginaw, Lansing

Studio (in)Process: Capture Your Love

6 to 9 p.m., Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at MSU, 547 E. Circle Dr., East Lansing

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