Opinion
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When I taught writing to college freshmen, I would remind students the key to success was steady work. “This isn’t a class you can cram for,” I warned students at the beginning of each semester.  more
In May of this year, I wrote an email to President Samuel L. Stanley and Provost Teresa Woodruff of Michigan State University asking them to speak out against the rise in anti-Semitic attacks occurring in the United States. The outbreak of hostilities in Israel and Gaza became an excuse for desecrating synagogues and attacking Jews in the United States. I mentioned in my email that President Biden had called the attacks “despicable,” as they were. Yet MSU stayed silent and I received no response to my request. A month later, a friend and former writing professor at MSU sent Stanley an email with a link to a New York Times opinion piece by Matthew Bronfman. Bronfman urged university leaders to speak out against the rise in anti-Semitic activity on campus and to acknowledge the cost to Jewish students. Stanley did not respond to this email request, either. more
Leading a city as its mayor isn’t for the faint of heart. It takes courage, resolve and a knack for bringing people together around a shared vision for the community’s future. Sadly, our current mayor doesn’t appear to embody any of these qualities. Virtually invisible during much of the pandemic, Mayor Andy Schor’s first term has been marked by a troubled, tone deaf relationship with Lansing’s Black community and an egregious lack of honesty and transparency that breeds deep distrust of City Hall. That’s why we think it’s time for a change. more
In 1999, a moderate Republican (like a real moderate) named Patricia “Pan” Godchaux from Oakland County first proposed a bill in Michigan to prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation. more
Having apparently learned nothing from the last election, Republicans in the Michigan Legislature continue to push the false Trumpian narrative that the election was stolen amid widespread voter fraud. To “fix” this imaginary problem, they’ve introduced a ridiculous package of 39 bills that are explicitly designed to frustrate the ability of voters to exercise their electoral franchise. One of the bills would have required making a copy of your photo ID and sending it in with your absentee ballot. That bit of nonsense has since been watered down, but the intent is clear: disenfranchising as many voters as possible, especially if they vote by absentee ballot and are from predominantly Democratic areas with a high proportion of minority voters. Should lawmakers get enough votes to send these malformed voter suppression bills to the governor, we expect she will veto them without hesitation. more
Michigan Democrats are beaming that Republicans are not concocting the new legislative and congressional lines this year.  more
The candidates’ ability to repair longstanding racial inequities, reform public safety and help curb the city’s skyrocketing levels of gun violence are undoubtedly key issues in this year’s election cycle. We asked the candidates directly: How do you plan to use your position, if elected, to drive forward some meaningful social equity and/or public safety reforms in Lansing? more
Two more murders. Two more Lansing teenagers dead, bringing the city’s 2021 death toll by homicide to 15. And it’s only June. At this rate, Lansing is on track to easily outstrip last year’s record of 22 homicides — the most murders in a single year in decades. With the hottest days of summer just ahead, we’re bracing for even more senseless violence while community leaders scramble for answers. more
Five mayoral candidates facing off in the August primary election will battle it out on stage this month at a live, 60-minute televised debate hosted by FOX 47 News and City Pulse at 7 p.m June 24. more
Back in 2002, the Michigan Republican Party had a nifty (albeit unsuccessful) slogan for the three major Democratic gubernatorial candidates:  more
In Washington and in Lansing, it remains to be seen if the police reform proposals will survive a process where partisanship is oftentimes more important than protecting the interests and well-being of the American people. more
Serving as Lansing’s mayor has been an honor. We have grown the city for everyone and have tackled crises head-on. I’m proud of the achievements we’ve made and look forward to another four years of growing Lansing! more
Americans’ trust in our government has steadily eroded since the 1960s. more
For more than a quarter-century, Lansing Community College’s in-house FM radio station, WLNZ 89.7, has served up a compelling, eclectic mix of music, news and community-focused commentary for the benefit of the Greater Lansing region. The station also functioned as a teaching facility for many years, providing generations of LCC students with on-the-job broadcasting experience and mentoring from seasoned professionals. more
Officials at the Ingham County Health Department are leaning on census data to identify and drive outreach to areas of the county that are lagging behind on COVID-19 vaccination rates.  more
It was a chilly April day five years ago when I had a difficult choice: I could travel to my Hoosier homeland to make one last tearful visit to my grandparents’ home slated for demolition for a new road, or I could attend a Lansing park board meeting to try to save the beloved Scott Garden from the city’s destruction. more
Detroit Police Chief James Craig is retiring and Michigan Republican Party’s top brass appears to have successfully recruited the conservative cop to run for governor in 2022. more
Lansing residents could soon have the option to fundamentally shift how they elect their mayors, clerks and members of the City Council through a method that would consider second-choice preferences, eliminate primary elections and shift a wider candidate pool to the general election. more
Dear Jeff Bezos: You saved The Washington Post. So, why are you allowing one of your companies to undermine local journalism? more
The U.S. Census Bureau confirmed Monday what we long expected: Michigan will lose a congressional seat in 2022, officially starting an uncomfortable round of musical chairs as Michigan’s 14-member delegation shrivels to 13. more
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